Botulism Web Series

             

Botulism is a rare but serious intoxication that causes neuroparalytic illness. Three forms of botulism can occur: foodborne, infant/intestinal, and wound botulism. A case of botulism in a person greater than one year of age is considered a medical and public health emergency. As botulism can cause severe morbidity and mortality in patients, public health surveillance is essential for early detection and treatment. Through this Colorado Integrated Food Safety Center of Excellence web series, public health professionals will learn about various aspects of botulism and the role of public health including:

  • Foodborne Botulism (June 23, 2021 from 2:00 PM-3:00 PM ET)
  • Infant Botulism (August 4, 2021 from 2:00 PM-3:00 PM ET)
  • Wound Botulism (August 18, 2021 from 2:00 PM-3:00 PM ET)
  • Testing/Treatment Methods and Considerations (September 15, 2021 from 2:00 PM-3:00 PM ET)
  • Unusual Botulism Outbreaks (October 20, 2021 from 2:00 PM-3:00 PM ET)

 

DateBotulism Focus AreaPresentersSession Details

 

 

June 23rd

2-3pm ET

 

Click Here

For Webinar Recording

Foodborne Botulism

Marisa Bunning, PhD

Professor and Extension Specialist, Food Safety

Food Science and Human Nutrition

Colorado State University

 

Nicole Comstock, MSPH

Communicable Disease Deputy Branch Chief

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

 

Robin Trujillo, BSN, RN

Enteric Disease Unit Manager

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

When food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum (C. botulinum) spores is improperly preserved and stored under anaerobic conditions (such as canned or vacuum-packaged items), the spores can germinate and the bacteria can multiply, resulting in botulinum toxin production. If this food is eaten without sufficient heating to inactivate the toxin, foodborne botulism can occur. The toxin is absorbed through the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream and is carried to nerve endings where it blocks the release of neurotransmitters that allow for muscle response. The case fatality rate is 5% to 10%, although recovery may take months. Every case of foodborne botulism represents a public health emergency because the responsible food, whether homemade or commercial, may still be available for consumption and could make others ill.

 

This webinar will cover topics such as:

  • The microbiology, life cycle and pathogenesis of C. botulinum
  • Colorado botulism trends
  • Presentation of an outbreak involving improperly home canned vegetables
  • Home preservation safety information and resources

 

 

August 4th

2-3pm ET

 

Click here for webinar recording

Infant Botulism

Stephen S. Arnon, MD, MPH

Infant Botulism Treatment & Prevention Program

California Department of Public Health

 

Haydee A. Dabritz, PhD

Infant Botulism Treatment & Prevention Program

California Department of Public Health

Infant botulism is a serious gastrointestinal condition in infants up to 12 months of age and is the most commonly-reported form of botulism. When C. botulinum spores are ingested, bacteria can colonize in an infant’s intestines, producing toxins. Illness in infants can be mild with gradual onset or rapidly progressive resulting in sudden death.

 

This webinar will cover topics such as:

  • Etiology, pathophysiology, and management of infant botulism
  • National trends in infant botulism cases
  • Testing considerations for infants

 

 

August 18th

2-3pm ET

 

Click Here for Webinar Recording

Wound Botulism

Irina Cody, MPH

Epidemiologist, Foodborne Illness Team

Texas Department of State Health Services

 

Leslie Edwards, MHS, RN

Unit Lead, Clinical Consultations and Lab Surveillance Unit

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


When C. botulinum spores contaminate a wound and germinate, the bacteria multiply and produce toxin, causing wound botulism. As with foodborne botulism, the toxin is carried to target nerve cells and causes paralytic neuromuscular effects. People who inject drugs have a greater chance of getting wound botulism, but it can also occur in people after a traumatic injury such as motorcycle crashes and surgeries.

 

This webinar will cover topics such as:

  • Etiology, pathophysiology, risk factors and management of wound botulism
  • Overview of wound botulism trends nationwide
  • Wound botulism trends in Texas
  • Presentation of a recent wound botulism outbreak in Texas

 

 

September 15th

2-3pm ET

 

Click Here For Webinar Recording

Testing/Treatment Methods and Considerations

Clive Brown

Division of Global Migration and Quarantine

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Janet Dykes

Enteric Diseases Laboratory Branch

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Leslie Edwards

Clinical Consultations and Lab Surveillance Unit

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

Chelsey Griffin

Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

All types of botulism can be life-threatening and are considered medical emergencies. Several treatments are available to reduce severity of symptoms, including botulinum antitoxin and human botulism immune globulin. Treatment can reduce mortality if administered early, however hospitalization, respiratory support, nutritional support, and/or surgery may still be required.

 

This webinar will cover topics such as:

  • Clinical and laboratory diagnostic methods for botulism
  • Botulism treatment options and considerations
  • Advances in testing technology for C. botulinum
  • Investigational and novel treatments
  • Quarantine center roles

October 20th

2-3pm ET

 

Click Here for Webinar Recording

Unusual Botulism Outbreaks

 

 

 

Irina Cody, MPH

Epidemiologist, Foodborne Illness Team

Texas Department of State Health Services

 

 

Rachel Jervis, MPH

Program Manager, Foodborne, Enteric, + Waterborne Diseases

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

 

 

Lorinda Lhotka

Section Manager, Food Safety and Sanitation Program

 

 

Hilary Rosen, MPH

Epidemiologist, Disease Investigation Section

California Department of Public Health

 

Lieutenant Commander Chris Dankmyer

Environmental Health Manager, Maniilaq Health Association

Environmental Health Officer, United States Public Health Service

The last webinar in this series will provide a look into some of the strangest and most unusual botulism outbreaks across the nation.


© 2021 The Regents of the University of Colorado, a body corporate.
All rights reserved. All trademarks are registered property of the University. Used by permission only.