Moral Distress in the Public Health Workforce Webinar Recording


Cost

Free

Primary Competency

Public Health Sciences Skills
Description

What happens when a public health professional knows the ethically right thing to do, but isn’t able to do it? The emotional state that arises from this conflict is called “moral distress.” While this topic has been well defined and studied in the field of nursing, the COVID pandemic has brought to light similar conflicts faced by those who work in public health--first responders, contact tracers, policy makers and others who are charged with providing essential services for public health yet often work in difficult conditions with conflicting responsibilities and not enough resources and support--either from their organizations or the public they serve. Join our expert panel as we discuss how and why moral distress is arising in the public health workforce and delve into potential interventions to prevent and address it.

This webinar recording is intended for:

  • Public health professionals and students

  • Health care professionals, students and trainees

  • Members of the community interested in public health and ethics

Learning Objectives

By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Define and recognize the concept of moral distress in the workplace.
  • Examine ethical dilemmas facing the public health workforce today.
  • Discuss the impacts of moral distress on the public health workforce.
  • Consider solutions for addressing moral distress in the public health workforce.
Registration Information
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